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Jeremy Allaire's Radio
Kudos for Onfolio 2.0 Feed Reader

Congrats to the Onfolio team who have just released their public beta of Onfolio 2.0.  I have been using the new Feed Reader in Onfolio, and am loving it.  Here are a few nice features on the Feeds and Blogging front:

  • Firefox and IE support -- runs in the browser, or as a dockable deskbar
  • Newspaper views (nice DHTML app) make it extremely productive to plow through dozens or hundreds of feeds
  • Reading-list feature lets you productively browse through lots of items and mark those you want to go deep on for readying later
  • Nested collections of feeds
  • Search Feeds, with integration into Feedster and Daypop
  • Item capture -- you can pretty much capture any micro-content from the Web, your RSS feeds, your email, etc.
  • Blog This -- easily blog any item with support for all major weblog services
  • Auto-Blogging -- you can 'share' folders of captured content which are replicated as an HTML weblog, auto-posted into any blog, with generated RSS feeds, etc.

All of this is focused on Feed reading and Blogging, but Onfolio 2.0 builds on 1.0 which provides a great general-purpose content collection engine for your desktop and the Internet, including great built-in sharing and publishing tools.

Check it out!  Here is a detailed list of new features, screenshots and more.

Jeremy


 

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http://radio.weblogs.com/0113297/2004/12/16.html#a295
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Fri, 17 Dec 2004 03:39:49 GMT
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http://radiocomments.userland.com/comments?u=113297&p=295&link=http%3A%2F%2Fradio.weblogs.com%2F0113297%2F2004%2F12%2F16.html%23a295
Paying for Online Media
Thoughts on the economic basis of and consumer interests around pay media on the Internet.
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http://radio.weblogs.com/0113297/2004/09/16.html#a294
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Fri, 17 Sep 2004 01:36:48 GMT
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Bandwidth vs Storage

My discussion on the bandwidth versus storage versus quality debate on PaidContent.org.

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http://radio.weblogs.com/0113297/2004/09/16.html#a293
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Thu, 16 Sep 2004 15:54:01 GMT
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Flashing Mobile Content
Comments on emergence of Flash as a mobile format on PaidContent.org
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http://radio.weblogs.com/0113297/2004/09/14.html#a292
pubdate
Tue, 14 Sep 2004 19:31:57 GMT
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Comments on TiVo / NetFlix deal
TivoFlixing the Video world....
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http://radio.weblogs.com/0113297/2004/09/13.html#a291
pubdate
Tue, 14 Sep 2004 03:38:42 GMT
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The Internet of Video

Guest posting on PaidContent.org ... some thoughts on emerging opportunities in video on the Internet.

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http://radio.weblogs.com/0113297/2004/09/13.html#a290
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Tue, 14 Sep 2004 03:37:45 GMT
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Guest Blogging on PaidContent.org
I'm pleased to be a guest blogger / interview on Rafat Ali's PaidContent.org, among my favorite spots on the Web for my daily dose of digital media.  Rafat has launched the ContentNext series of guest blogs on his site.  I'll be writing on a variety of topics including Internet video, the role of Flash on mobile, TiVo/NetFlix deal, and several other topics during this week.  I'll also cross-link to each of my main posts.
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http://radio.weblogs.com/0113297/2004/09/13.html#a289
pubdate
Tue, 14 Sep 2004 03:36:54 GMT
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Distracted...by TV
I've been quite distracted over the past couple of months with interesting things happening in the broadband video world.  The "video industry" on the Internet is starting to emerge with great force and I'm excited to be focused on this area.  I will try and be regular in posting and sharing thoughts again.
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http://radio.weblogs.com/0113297/2004/04/20.html#a288
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Wed, 21 Apr 2004 02:38:42 GMT
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Onfolio, Micro-content, and Search Information Management

Today, Onfolio Inc. launched their namesake product Onfolio, helping to shape and define a new and important category in Internet software -- search information management. 

Onfolio helps Internet users to easily collect, organize and share their research.  The product is built around the idea that 'search' has become the most common Internet activity, yet end-users have had virtually no good tools to help them manage and share all the "micro-content" that they find on the Internet.

The product tightly integrates into Internet Explorer, Microsoft Office and the Windows desktop, enabling users to capture fragments of content from web pages, email, RSS feeds, and their desktop.  In essence, users create content 'collections', personal databases of micro-content that can be organized and searched locally, but then re-composed into reports that can be shared via email, posted as websites, and published as RSS feeds.

Forbes.com characterizes it's essential role:  "Onfolio faces head-on the problem of information overload, giving Internet users ways to capture and reuse the many tidbits they come across in everyday Internet use."

The uses of the product touch anyone who seriously uses the Web, whether for personal or professional use.  The Onfolio website has some great usage examples to help spark your imagination.

Onfolio was founded by my brother J.J. Allaire, and also led by Allaire co-founders Adam Berrey and Charles Teague.  They've done a great job creating an exceptionally useful product that will help all of us become more productive users of information on the Internet.

I can personally attest that Onfolio has transformed my relationship with content on the Internet -- I am more in control of the surging amount of micro-content that floods websites, email, RSS feeds and beyond.  Thanks guys!

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http://radio.weblogs.com/0113297/2004/03/14.html#a287
pubdate
Mon, 15 Mar 2004 03:39:53 GMT
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Shaking up the Web Conferencing Market

This week Convoq launched their flagship personal web conferencing service, As Soon As Present (ASAP).  The launch is a milestone for the web conferencing marketplace which has to date been characterized by enterprise-focused price points, despite software experiences that have not yet graduated into the modern age of rich client interfaces and experiences and presence-enabled communications.

Convoq ASAP breaks a lot of ground in the convergence of presence management, rich media instant messaging and multi-participant web conferencing, and do this with an economics for the mass-market.  For less than $100 per year, users of ASAP can conduct an ulimited number of meetings with up to 25 participants.  Comparative pricing from Microsoft LiveMeeting (Placeware) and WebEx is in the tens of thousands of dollars. 

This approach to the market reflects Convoq's philosophy that real-time, rich media multi-participant online collaboration is ready to be an everyday productivity application, not a stovepipe system that is limited in its use to those "premium" sales calls or online demos.  The focus on making real-time collaboration more common is reflected in Convoq's thoughtful embrace of productivity-enhacing presence and convocation management features, helping either large or distributed organizations gather the right people at the right time in online settings.

If you or your organization makes regular use of instant messaging and web conferencing in a professional (or personal!) context, I'd encourage you to evaluate Convoq ASAP.

As a board member of Convoq, it's very exciting to see this innovative communications service launch -- congrats to the entire Convoq team!  I can also say that while the 1.0 product accomplishes a lot, this team has an incredible vision and roadmap for where to take online communications and collaboration, so please stay tuned.

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http://radio.weblogs.com/0113297/2004/02/20.html#a286
pubdate
Fri, 20 Feb 2004 16:42:20 GMT
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When does Microsoft get commoditzed?

Kevin Werbach pointed to this note about the fact that a baseline personal computer is now sub $500, following the trajectory of Moore's Law, yet the price of the software needed (from a professional perspective -- WinXP Pro and Office) costs more than the hardware. 

I've been spending considerable time looking at the economics of software manufacturing and distribution in the face of open source and offshore software development, and it strikes me that in the near future Microsoft will clearly face an erosion of their core software margin business as a result of the commoditizing economics of clone software manufactured in China at 1/100th (or less) the cost of manufacturing the software in Redmond. 

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http://radio.weblogs.com/0113297/2004/02/17.html#a285
pubdate
Tue, 17 Feb 2004 06:54:11 GMT
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http://radiocomments.userland.com/comments?u=113297&p=285&link=http%3A%2F%2Fradio.weblogs.com%2F0113297%2F2004%2F02%2F17.html%23a285

#
Some notes:
re: autodiscovery... some of the blo.gs entries actually already have the rss link included... and I'm currently thinking about using a AmpetaDesk like bookmarklet to add geeds to my list

re: sorting of feeds:
The reader itself 'remembers' the feeds I've viewed and ranks them after the last time I accessed/viewed them. It's a very simple form of interst filtering. Feeds I don't view go down, the ones I'm really interested in go up.


alles Bild, Text und Tonmaterial ist © Martin Spernau, Verwendung und Reproduktion erfordert die Zustimmung des Authors

Martin Spernau
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